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ELEPHANTS IN ZOOS: A LEGACY OF SHAME

ELEPHANTS IN ZOOS: A LEGACY OF SHAME

By Born Free Foundation Our major new report, Elephants in Zoos: A Legacy of Shame, released today, is backed by a host of leading conservation and animal welfare experts including Damian Aspinall, Chris Packham CBE, Angela Sheldrick, Dr Cynthia Moss, Dr Winnie Kiiru, David Casselman and Dr Keith Lindsay.  The report reveals the true extent of the pain and suffering being caused by the keeping of elephants in zoos across Europe. In Europe alone, there are still 580 of these magnificent herd animals held in zoos, including 49 in 11 establishments in the UK. Using powerful...

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Japan’s Tireless Ivory Market: A Trader’s Haven Free of Strict Controls

Japan’s Tireless Ivory Market: A Trader’s Haven Free of Strict Controls

By Masayuki Sakamoto, Executive Director of the Japan Tiger and Elephant Fund (JTEF) Executive Summary Africa’s elephants continue to be in crisis due to poaching for trading their ivory, and domestic markets for ivory have been closing worldwide to combat this crisis. The 18th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP18) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) adopted a decision, aimed at promoting the implementation of the recommendation on the closure of domestic ivory markets included in Resolution Conf.10.10 amended at CoP17,...

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Investigation into the Efficacy of Namibia’s Wildlife Conservation Model as it Relates to African Elephants (Loxodonta africana)

Investigation into the Efficacy of Namibia’s Wildlife Conservation Model as it Relates to African Elephants (Loxodonta africana)

By Adam Cruise and Izzy Sasada Namibia is often presented as a country with exemplary elephant and wildlife conservation management, where wildlife thrives and rural communities living among and alongside Namibia’s elephants and other wildlife reportedly benefit socially and economically. Namibia ostensibly allows rural communities the opportunity to manage and benefit from their natural resources through the creation of communal conservancies through a process known as Community-Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM). These conservancies – together with central and regional government,...

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Speciesism and the Wildlife Trade: Who gets Listed, Downlisted and Uplisted in CITES?

Speciesism and the Wildlife Trade: Who gets Listed, Downlisted and Uplisted in CITES?

By Alison Hutchinson, Nathan Stephens-Griffin, Tanya Wyatt - Northumbria University, United Kingdom AbstractWildlife faces a number of threats due to human activity, including overexploitation from excessive and/or illegal trade. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is the main international legal instrument to address such overexploitation. However, not all species threatened by excessive trade are protected by CITES, leading to criticism that it is an instrument for the preservation of exploitation as opposed to the protection of...

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