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Studies

Nationwide abundance and distribution of African forest elephants across Gabon using non-invasive SNP genotyping

Nationwide abundance and distribution of African forest elephants across Gabon using non-invasive SNP genotyping

By A. Laguardia, S. Bourgeois, S. Strindberg, K.S. Gobush, G. Abitsi, H.G. Bikang Bi Ateme, F.  Ebouta, J.M. Fay, A.M. Gopalaswamy, F. Maisels, E.L.F. Simira Banga Daouda, L.J.T. White & E. J. Stokes - Science Direct Abstract Robust monitoring programs are essential for understanding changes in wildlife population dynamics and distribution over time, especially for species of conservation concern. In this study, we applied a rapid non-invasive sampling approach to the Critically Endangered African forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis), at nationwide scale in its principal remaining...

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In prioritizing conservation, animal culture should be a factor, study says

In prioritizing conservation, animal culture should be a factor, study says

By John C. Cannon - MongaBay Research has shown that culture exists in myriad animal species, allowing information to be shared between generations, leading to occurrences of tool use and potentially affecting animals’ adaptability to changes to their environment.In a new paper, scientists propose a stepwise process to account for and protect animal culture in conservation efforts.They advocate an approach to conservation that integrates culture with conventional considerations such as genetic diversity, rather than using it as a “stand-alone” tool. The earliest reports of nutcracking...

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Study demonstrates accuracy of less invasive technique for monitoring wildlife health

Study demonstrates accuracy of less invasive technique for monitoring wildlife health

By Matt Shipman, North Carolina State University - Phys.org A recent study from North Carolina State University finds a technique that uses dried spots of blood to measure health indicators in elephants is comparable to techniques that use larger blood samples and require immediate cold storage—technology that is not always available when monitoring animals in the wild. "Our study focused on omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, which can be measured in blood and tell us a lot about an animal's health," says Jordan Wood, who recently defended her Ph.D. dissertation at NC State and first author of...

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Large Herbivores May Improve an Ecosystem’s Carbon Persistence

Large Herbivores May Improve an Ecosystem’s Carbon Persistence

By Rishika Pardikar - EOS. he grazing habits of wild animals like elephants and boars enable long-term carbon storage, according to new research that stresses the need to align climate mitigation goals with biodiversity conservation. Wildlife and open-canopy ecosystems like grasslands are rarely a part of discussions surrounding climate change mitigation. Now, a new review points to interactions between wild herbivores and vegetation to show how restoration efforts could be optimized by aligning climate goals with biodiversity conservation. The idea that herbivores are necessarily...

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