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Elephant facial motor control

Elephant facial motor control

By Lena V. Kaufmann, Undine Schneeweis, Eduard Maier, Thomas Hildebrandt & Michael Brecht - Science Advances Abstract  We studied facial motor control in elephants, animals with muscular dexterous trunks. Facial nucleus neurons (~54,000 in Asian elephants, ~63,000 in African elephants) outnumbered those of other land-living mammals. The large-eared African elephants had more medial facial subnucleus neurons than Asian elephants, reflecting a numerically more extensive ear-motor control. Elephant dorsal and lateral facial subnuclei were unusual in elongation, neuron numerosity, and a...

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Mapping potential connections between Southern Africa’s elephant populations

Mapping potential connections between Southern Africa’s elephant populations

By Ryan M. Huang  ,Rudi J. van Aarde  ,Stuart L. Pimm,Michael J. Chase,Keith Leggett - PlosOne Abstract Southern Africa spans nearly 7 million km2 and contains approximately 80% of the world’s savannah elephants (Loxodonta africana) mostly living in isolated protected areas. Here we ask what are the prospects for improving the connections between these populations? We combine 1.2 million telemetry observations from 254 elephants with spatial data on environmental factors and human land use across eight southern African countries. Telemetry data show what natural features limit elephant...

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Combating the Use of Cyanide Poison in Ivory Poaching

Combating the Use of Cyanide Poison in Ivory Poaching

By Richard Hoare, Chris Foggin, Steve Alexander, Divine Chakombera - African Journal of Wildlife Research Abstract Malicious, commercial or retaliatory poisoning of wildlife is increasing across Africa, including the killing of elephants (Loxodonta africana) to supply the illegal ivory trade. Regional differences exist in the types of poisons used by poachers and in Zimbabwe cyanide has become more commonly employed in recent years – sourced illegally from its commercial use in the gold mining industry. Cyanide is potent, so can be rapidly lethal in small quantities and is...

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Who is adjusting to whom?: Differences in elephant duel activity in wildlife corridors across different human-modified landscapes

Who is adjusting to whom?: Differences in elephant duel activity in wildlife corridors across different human-modified landscapes

By Adams T.S.F., Leggett K.E.A, Chase, M.J. & Tucker M. - Frontiers in Conservation ABSTRACT The global impact of increased human activities has consequences on the conservation of wildlife. Understanding how wildlife adapts to increased human pressures with urban expansion and agricultural areas is fundamental to future conservation plans of any species. However, there is a belief that large wild free-ranging carnivores and ungulates, cannot coexist with people, limited studies have looked at wildlife movements through differing human-dominated landscapes at finer spatial scales,...

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